Alumnae Share Career Advice at ‘Pizza with Professionals’

Sandy Woodman ’03 and Nicole Andersen ’05 shared their journey from undergraduate life to their current corporate level careers at Enterprise with students during Pizza with Professionals in September in King Alumni Hall.

Sandy Woodman ‘03 and Nicole Andersen ‘05 share career advice with current students during Pizza with Professionals in September in King Alumni Hall.

Sandy Woodman ‘03 and Nicole Andersen ‘05 share career advice with current students during Pizza with Professionals in September in King Alumni Hall.

Pizza with Professionals gives students the opportunity to sit down with successful alumni and discuss what it’s like to enter the career world. It’s a relaxed, comfortable setting where students can ask questions, network and enjoy a hot slice.

Woodman and Andersen welcomed questions from students with majors ranging from journalism to accounting. Students’ questions varied from advice on résumés to interview tips to specific questions about Enterprise.

Woodman said that Enterprise is one of the largest employers of college graduates. As upperclassmen prepare for life as future alumni in a competitive job market, companies that often hire for entry-level positions are certainly on students’ radars.

“Interview skills, interview skills, interview skills,” Woodman stressed to students.

Enterprise is a company that promotes from within the organization. Therefore, Woodman and Andersen have gone through the interview process many times to get where they are in the company now.

Andersen advised students to attend career fairs on campus to make connections, and to visit Career Services to get résumé writing help.

“It’s great what the campus has to offer you,” Andersen said. “You can’t ever be too prepared.” Andersen also encouraged students to be open about any weaknesses they have when entering the workforce.

“Show what you’re doing to take the initiative to improve yourself,” Andersen said. “It’s important to welcome constructive criticism and not take it personally. Ultimately, it’s going to make you better.”

Overall, Woodman and Andersen both encouraged students not to limit themselves. Many undergraduates feel they have a set track they need to stay on in order to be successful. Woodman, who started off wanting to be a judge and even attended law school, said that’s not always the case.

“Don’t be afraid to branch out,” Woodman said. “You may be a little scared at first, but if it’s a risk worth taking, you’re going to be glad that you did.”

—Brittany Sperino Horsford ’14

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